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A level

Why do soap bubbles look "oily"?At A level students take more responsibility for their own learning and are expected to spend a significant amount of time each week engaged in private study and reading around the subject.

Have a look at the links page and some of the popular scientific press to keep up with recent advances. You can find periodicals and reference materials both in the library and in the Physics labs. 



The information below refers to the legacy A level course and applies only to Upper 6th form students.

We study the AQA Physics 'A' course.  Each year covers three units, two being assessed by written exams and the third with a school-based ISA practical assessment.  Both AS exams are sat at the end of the lower 6th year and A2 exams are in January and June of the Upper 6th year. You can find the specification for them here


Unit Title Assessment % final mark
AS 1 Particles, Quantum Phenomena and Electricity 1 1/4 hr exam, structured questions 20
2 Mechanics, Materials and Waves 1 1/4 hr exam, structured questions 20
3 Investigative and Practical Skills Practical task and written paper, marked by exam board 10
A2 4 Fields and Further Mechanics 1 3/4 hr exam, multiple choice ancd structured questions 20
5 Nuclear Physics and Turning Points 1 3/4 hr exam, structured questions 20
6 Investigative and Practical Skills Practical task and written paper, marked by exam board 10

At A level students take more responsibility for their own learning and are expected to spend a significant amount of time each week engaged in private study and reading around the subject - you should expect to spend about as much time working on your own as you do in lessons.

Have a look at the links page and some of the popular scientific press to keep up with recent advances. There is a recommended reading list which you should use. You can find periodicals and reference materials both in the library and in the Physics labs. 

Course books

textbook, workbook and revision guides

Datasheet

Extension lessons

Website sections

GCSE
A level

Useful links

New Scientist
Scientific American
Hyperphysics
Schoolphysics.co.uk
Google
Wikipedia













SASPhysics.com